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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 2, 2017 7:00am-7:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker. rail fares go up today. campaigners call it a kick in the teeth for long—suffering passengers. the government says it's delivering the biggest modernisation programme for more than a century. good morning, it's monday, january 2nd. also this morning: funerals are held for victims of the gun attack on an istanbul nightclub. a manhunt is underway for the gunman. police arrest five men after a 12—year—old girl was killed and her 11—year—old cousin left fighting for her life in a hit—and—run in oldham. good morning. in sport, arsenal forward olivier giroud produces one of the goals of the season, an incredible scorpion kick in a 2—0 win over crystal palace to help his side move up to third
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in the premier league. she was given a 1% chance of survival after a devastating motorbike accident, but now commonwealthjudo star stephanie inglis tells breakfast she's determined to win another medal for her country. and matt has the weather. good morning. it is a frosty and icy start. view, but if you delete your new yea rs start. view, but if you delete your new years walk yesterday because of the rain today is the day to get out is -- the rain today is the day to get out is —— get outdoors. good morning. first, our main story. rail fares across england, wales and scotland will rise today, with passengers facing an average increase of more than 2%. public transport campaigners say the fare rises are "another kick in the teeth for long—suffering rail passengers". but the transport secretary, chris grayling, said the government was delivering the biggest rail modernisation programme for more than a century. here's our transport correspondent, richard westcott. punctuality across britain is well below target,
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strikes have brought one of the busiest operators to a standstill, but none of it stops rail fares going up again today. i think it's a disgrace. particularly as the railways aren't efficient, you know? there's always delays. in terms of the increase, well, it's fair. you've got to pay for things, if it includes paying for wages and people earning more money. across britain, the average ticket will be 2.3% more expensive. season tickets, among the fares regulated by the government, go up less at i.9%. it follows years of stinging rises. even allowing for inflation, fares have risen 25% since the mid—1990s. season tickets in the south—east of england are now regularly over £4,000 or £5,000. successive governments have put the prices up because they want passengers to pay a bigger proportion of the rail bill so that other taxpayers pay less. ministers say they're reinvesting billions of pounds to improve
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the service with new stations, better signals and electrified lines. around the rail network there's a lot happening, billions of pounds being spent. nobody wants to see a fare increase but costs rise, pay rises, and right now fares are rising less fast than wages, so that's a step in the right direction. campaigners are calling for a freeze or even a price cut, claiming that ordinary people are being priced off the trains. our reporter leanne brown joins us now from kings cross station. hgppy happy new year. it isn't the nicest news to receive. many people are going to complain that it will cost more. it is fairly quiet here at king's cross station this morning because it's a bank holiday, but i have spoken to some people inside and many people bought their train tickets today in advance, so they weren't affected by the price rises
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today. but they say they will continue to do that, to try to get the cheapest prices and try to beat those fare increases. of course it will affect commuters the most, who do trainjourneys will affect commuters the most, who do train journeys they in, day out, and public transport campaigners have called this a kick in the teeth. they say passengers have faced disruption, delays, cancellations and a pretty poor service over the past year and now we will have to pay even more for it, which they say is totally unfair. if you are travelling today, you can expect various amounts of increases, depending on which operator you are going with. for example, virgin trains will see their prices rise by about [i.9%. passengers very much unhappy with this and they are going to stage protests here at king's cross and across the country tomorrow. thank you very much for that. labour have
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compared some of the costs, they say the highest increase was virgin trains' season—ticket between birmingham and london euston. it now costs £10,200 to make thatjourney throughout the year. we'll be asking the chief executive of transport focus about these changes in a few minutes. they carry out research throughout the year, so will hopefully give a clear picture of what is happening on the railways. funerals have taken place for some of those killed in yesterday's gun attack on a nightclub in the turkish city of istanbul. 39 people were killed, with many more injured. a manhunt is under way to find the gunman. seref isler reports. captured on camera, the moment bullets hit the nightclub in istanbul as attackers approach. security guards scramble as bullets ricochet around them. some try to run away, in vain. the victims had all gone to reina to celebrate the new year.
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now, some will never go home. this funeral was for a tour guide, ayhan arik, who'd just been dropping off some tourists at the nightclub. turkey wa nts turkey wants a bit of stability in an otherwise volatile middle east and is facing its worst period of violence in decades. the attacks in 2015 and 2016 have hit military and civilian targets alike. turkey now says most of the dead at the reina nightclub are foreign nationals. the attacker remains at large. the prime minister says they will leave no stone unturned to find him. translation: terror cannot intimidate us. we will intimidate terror. we will continue to fight against it. our biggest insurance is to see our people standing in solidarity and supporting our result. turkey has vowed to fight terrorism again.
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in 2016, almost 400 people lost their lives in terror attack. this brutal start to 2017 is an ominous sign for the year to come. five men have been arrested after a 12—year—old girl was killed in an apparent hit—and—run in oldham in greater manchester. it happened on new year's eve. another girl is in a critical condition in hospital. richard lister reports. police say the five men, aged from 18 to 59, are still in custody and are being questioned about the crash, which killed 12—year—old helina kotlarova and critically injured her cousin, zaneta krokova, who's11. when we ran there, she was on the floor. she had blood all over herface, and i was touching her, i was trying to see if she's going to breathe or something, but she couldn't breathe or nothing. and i've seen herface, this face was all, you know, bleeding and...
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there was nothing...to do. helina's sister said the two girls were crossing ashton road and holding hands when they were hit hit a black vw golf, which sped away. police want to speak to anyone who saw that car, or a dark—coloured peugeot 807 seen in the area. they have also appealed for the driver of a white van which was on the same stretch of road to come forward. greater manchester police said specially trained officers were supporting the girls‘ families. richard lister, bbc news. the first 1a areas in england to be selected for so—called garden villages have been announced in a bid to create tens of thousands of new homes. the new villages must include green spaces and good transport links. the government says that the plans will help provide vital homes. but rural campaigners have warned there is still strong opposition to some of the projects. hull's year as the uk city of culture started with a bang last night, as thousands of people watched a fireworks display
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from the banks of the humber estuary. £32 million has been spent on the year—long programme which is hoped to bring in more than one million visitors. our arts correspondent colin paterson reports. hull, celebrating its year as city of culture with fireworks bigger than those in london on new year's eve, to a soundtrack of the city's most famous musical exports. this is made in hull, an audiovisual spectacular across the city centre, showing hull's most famous buildings in their best light. it was the first event in a year—long £32 million cultural program. what a fantastic thing for hull. it was brilliant. the best night, honestly. come on, come to hull! and it has been a special night for one hull landlady.
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every weekend linda plays singalong classics to a pub packed with about 80 people. one of the 2017 organisers spotted her... # touching me, touching you...# and here, she deejayed to a crowd of 35,000. it takes a while to warm up but a couple more and... i've had amazing fun. just watching the crowd, they're amazing. it is fabulous, fantastic. the party has well and truly started. the trick for hull is going to be to keep it going all year. hull's aim is for1 million extra people to visit in 2017. a city at the end of the road wants to become a destination of choice. they know how to celebrate!
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after ten years of swimming circles, bbc one is bidding goodbye to its famous hippos in the title sequences played before tv programmes. they they are! the hippos are paddling off and will make way for a rather different group of water lovers, a group of open water swimmers from somerset. it's just one of a range of new idents being launched by the channel that aim to capture the spirit of "oneness" and reflect the diversity of modern britain. i am going to miss those hippos. the weather forecast in a few minutes. we return now to our top story. ticket prices on trains across england, wales and scotland are going up from today. the rail delivery group announced last month that prices will go up on average by two point 3%, but fares won't change in northern ireland. it's the latest in a string of increases. even allowing for inflation, fares have risen by around 25% since the mid 1990s. season tickets go up a little less, at 1.9%.
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in the south—east of england, season tickets now cost more than £11,000. we're joined now by anthony smith, chief executive of transport focus, from kings cross station. thank you very much for coming on and a happy new year. it is another price rise. how are fed do you think this is for people who are thinking of going back to work? —— fair. it is more money to spend on the service that many already complain about. as the independent watchdog for written's passengers, we think it will be a chilly start. nobody wa nts a it will be a chilly start. nobody wants a price rise. we already have theirs going up on what are already in some cases higher prices. secondly, any wages aren't going up by the same amount, so they have to find this money. —— from somewhere else. and in parts of the country
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performance has been patchy, so it won't feel very fair. does your researcher what percentage of people believe they get value for money when they buy train tickets? an enormous spread of value for money scores we've seen in our research. for commuters it is usually though were. they go to work and have to pay an increase every year. for people who can book in advance and get those cheaper fares you can get some very high scores, so you get an enormous range. but what everybody wa nts to enormous range. but what everybody wants to see for their ticket price is to get the trains on time, you get morejobs keeping people happy. we will speak to the chief executive of the rail delivery group later, so he represents the people running the trains. iam he represents the people running the trains. i am sure what they would say is they are under pressure to make improvements to the service and i suppose it is almost impossible to improve the service that people complain about because then you complain about because then you complain about because then you complain about the fact that it ta kes complain about the fact that it takes more time to get to where you
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need to go and it costs more money. but the rail companies will say they are trying to improve the service so you don't have to complain and it can be more efficient. there's great investment happening at the moment. a lot of that comes from passengers. about £9 billion a year comes from fa res about £9 billion a year comes from fares from the industry. of course it can be a bit painful, the dingoes in sometimes and making those improvements, or go this year we have seen through the return of the engineering work. it is great when it happens, but we try to make it as painless as possible for passengers. you can't improve the service without causing chaos? it isn't impossible. we've seen this year it has been done quite well. around christmas and new year, it works will be coming up. and of course works for hs2. good information, lots of stuff on the day and warning passengers in advance, you can make its move. those are part of the
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things you would like to see rail companies deliver this year? very much so. i think the wish list from passengers is probably three things, one of which is get more trains on time, secondly, if you are doing improvement works, he passengers informed and have lots of stuff around and thirdly keep the pressure down on fare rises because nobody wa nts to down on fare rises because nobody wants to pay more. thanks very much for your time this morning. i think you are right. if you are told that you are right. if you are told that you will have a bad trip, at least that reduces your anger little bit, if you are told what happening. it does help. keep us informed, please. thank you. we will speak to the chief executive of the rail delivery later in the programme. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the annual rise in rail fares takes effect today, with passengers facing average increases of more than 2%.
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the manhunt continues in turkey for a gunman who killed 39 people in an istanbul nightclub during a new year party. it isa it is a frosty start in many parts of the united kingdom this morning. matt has the weather this morning for us. good morning. it certainly isa for us. good morning. it certainly is a cold start. if you delayed your new year walk because of the rain, you won't have to. you can get outdoors and enjoy. cold and crisp this morning. frost and ice for one or two. it is not sunny or clear everywhere. we have cloud across the english channel and outbreaks in the channel islands the bidet. showers in eastern england bringing an ice risk. still, further showers in the north of scotland and the north of northern ireland. we do have a risk of ice this morning to go with their showers. a mixture of sweet and hill snow. by two winds compared with
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yesterday. lots of sunshine. across england and wales, a big improvement committee yesterday. a bit of fast elsewhere. most starting the day clear and sunny elsewhere. most starting the day clearand sunny —— elsewhere. most starting the day clear and sunny —— frost. except across the channel isles, which will have cloud and occasional rain. get out side and during the sunshine. a few showers in northern scotland through the day. showers in eastern england will depart into the north sea. gliding overfor england will depart into the north sea. gliding over for scotland england will depart into the north sea. gliding overfor scotland and northern ireland compared with yesterday. a fine day for most. six celsius the general high. windy across parts of eastern england. high—pressure for the rest of the week. we have the run of cold north to north—westerly winds as we go to the latter stage of the day and into the latter stage of the day and into the night. the breeze will bring more cloud to scotland, northern ireland, and parts of england and
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wales. a few spots of rain. wettest in shetland. most will be dry and clear to the south and east and cold est clear to the south and east and coldest across england and wales tonight with temperatures in rural parts of tomorrow morning around —5 minus six. if you are returning to work tomorrow, you will be scraping the car southern areas. generally, a lot more cloud around tomorrow when the odd spot of rain and drizzle. dampest conditions in the north of scotland. another bank holiday tomorrow. turning brighter by the end of the day across parts of orkney and shetland. temperatures up on today's values, but tempered by cloud and a breeze. strong wind through the night into wednesday down eastern areas especially the shetland. severe gales and frequent showers. high—pressure nudging into the west again. back to sunny weather for wednesday and thursday. cold by night in the first but pleasa nt cold by night in the first but pleasant by day. good to hear. see you later. a story we were talking
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about 15 minutes ago now. stephanie inglis was given just a 1% chance of survival when she was in a motorbike accident last year. now the judo star says she's hoping to win one more medal. the crash in vietnam left her in a coma, but people all over the world raised hundreds of thousands of pounds to get her back home. lorna gordon went to meet her. backin back in the gym and working her way back to good hills. nice long strides. last summer, stephanie inglis was in a come up with a serious rain injury. her training to become an elite athlete made a real difference to the speed of her recovery, she says —— serious injury. if it wasn't for the fact i was so strong and fit before, it probably would not have been so good. that has helped boost my recovery so quickly. stefanie had beenin recovery so quickly. stefanie had been in vietnam teaching english when she was injured travelling on a
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motorbike taxi. she remembers teaching her class but little else of that day. and nothing from the weeks after. now it is about looking ahead. i don't want to let myself get down. i haven't cried since the night of the accident. i think that isa night of the accident. i think that is a waste of my time. if i spent time filling down or sorry for myself, it could be easy for me to do that, but it will not help my progression and could set me back. do that, but it will not help my progression and could set me backlj tend not to dwell on it. silver medal, stephanie inglis. years of training led her to a place on the podium at the last commonwealth games. that drive and determination is still evident. what a agent civilisations believe? is still evident. what a agent civilisations believe ? there is still evident. what a agent civilisations believe? there was a god that passed to the heavens each day. her sister helping her with exercises that are part of her rehabilitation. she's doing speech and language and sometimes gets way to do so she gets me to give her a hand. it is good to be part of that and help her. is she a hard task
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must? she can be at times. that is good. i do need help. with this support from her friends and family. stefa nie support from her friends and family. stefanie has one ambition family in mind. my long-term goal is to get back into sport and to compete in the next commonwealth games judo, which is in the 2022 games. i do think if i get accepted for tim scotland, i am capable of winning another medal. her family, grandmother, and grandfather ijust grateful their daughter is alive. and then fall for the donations from strangers of more than £300,000 towards her life—saving treatment abroad —— and grateful. towards her life—saving treatment abroad —— and gratefullj towards her life—saving treatment abroad -- and grateful. i can't thank them enough. she is here. it isa thank them enough. she is here. it is a lyrical. it is thanks to everybody who donated to her and brought home —— miracle. everybody who donated to her and brought home -- miracle. it is a delight to go into another year with her with us. as a whole family, it isa her with us. as a whole family, it is a delight. with the new year
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comes another big operation. she is hopeful she will soon be fit enough to move back to herflat hopeful she will soon be fit enough to move back to her flat start a job. surviving this accident, and 28—year—old defied the odds and is aiming highforthe 28—year—old defied the odds and is aiming high for the future. a big challenge ahead. from that challenge to another one. it's a monumental test of endurance which sees teams row thousands of miles across the atlantic without any assistance. we followed the yorkshire rows last year as they took on the talisker atlantic challenge, and now four friends are following in their wake. breakfast‘s tim muffett went to meet them before they set off. why embark on a journey as arduous as this? 3000 miles unsupported, rolling across the atlantic. for some, to be, rory and harry, the a nswer some, to be, rory and harry, the answer is clear, as they explained before setting off. ten years ago my brotherjames passed before setting off. ten years ago my brother james passed away. before setting off. ten years ago my brotherjames passed away. he took his own life. i have always wanted
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to do something injames' memory, and along came the challenge of growing the atlantic. whenjames died, iwas growing the atlantic. whenjames died, i was really blissfully unaware of what a major problem suicide is, especially in young men. the aim is to get more people, young men especially, talking about any problems they might have. the problems they might have. the problem with guys is that they see opening up about their feelings or things they are concerned about, they see it as an effeminate thing to do. you almost wanted to rape their lives and cast some image of themselves that others may be impressed by —— they almost want to curate their lives. last year, the yorkshire rows completed the same epicjourney. yorkshire rows completed the same epic journey. they became yorkshire rows completed the same epicjourney. they became the oldest
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all—female crew to do so. epicjourney. they became the oldest all-female crew to do so. well done! we took a lot of inspiration from the yorkshire rows. incredible what they achieved. money raised will find new crisis centres, places where people who need help can find it. the first open will be in liverpool. they will be called james' place. i know when times are tough and we are rolling, i can a lwa ys tough and we are rolling, i can always remember exactly why we are doing it, and i know my brother james will be looking out over all four of us and will be our guiding light -- four of us and will be our guiding light —— rowing. four of us and will be our guiding light -- rowing. certainly won't be lacking inspiration. fingers crossed. from the middle of the atlantic ocean, harry wentworth—stanley and the team join me now. can you hear us? yes, good morning from the high seas. lovely to see you. i know you have the others with you. i know you have the others with
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you. how has it been going so far? you have been at sea for two weeks now. yes. today it will be day 20. we are well into the routine, and it has been brilliant so far. it has been extraordinary. we are loving every minute of it. harry, have physically challenging has been? you are not lacking inspiration when you are not lacking inspiration when you are thinking about james are not lacking inspiration when you are thinking aboutjames and the issues he had and others have had since then as well, but how demanding has been on your body ‘s? imean, it demanding has been on your body ‘s? i mean, it has definitely taken its toll. the routine is relentless. you just row and you get your rest in, and you row and you get your rest in. the routine goes on and on. through the night and all day. so it is very taxing on the body. but we are coping with it, and we are relishing it, and we are enjoying
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it. it is the most extraordinary thing we have ever done. we are making the most of it. and you know each other well. what has christmas been like? have you been sharing mince pies? you had a bit of a storm over new year. how are you coping being away at this time of year?|j mean, being away at this time of year?” mean, obviously christmas day was really the first day we probably reflected on, because we had not stopped growing until christmas day. —— rowing. so we pulled the oars in and we sat around on christmas morning and opened a few presents, andi morning and opened a few presents, and i was really the first time we have reflected on what we have achieved already, and he was back out. it was a nice moment. there we had a chat on the phone. are you still there, harry? that was the
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second time the boat to come to a stop. we saw in the new year with a little drink. it has been, to be honest, it has gone so quickly.” can't believe it. can you prime rory? i were to have a word with rory. you said you have spoken to yourfamily back rory. you said you have spoken to your family back home. what do they think of this challenge and the fact you are raising money and awareness and hopefully a lasting legacy for your brother, who died ten years ago? yes. obviously, when i first mentioned that i wanted to do this challenge in memory ofjames, there we re challenge in memory ofjames, there were mixed emotions. there was honestly a huge amount of support for wanting to do something in james' name, and raise money for the charity, but there was a bit of concern especially from my mother, he dreaded the thought of me embarking on this big journey. —— who dreaded. but we have worked so ha rd who dreaded. but we have worked so hard and trying so hard and done all
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of the preparation we possibly could, and i think that gave her a lot of conflict, and here we are. we are past the halfway mark. —— comfort. everybody is proud and loves the fact that james' name and spirit lives on to the challenge. great to hear. can you pass the phone onto rory? i don't know how long it will take to get in on? rory has been updating the blogs of these four young men, who are rolling the atla ntic four young men, who are rolling the atlantic and hoping to arrive in antigua in the stamford bridge. are you there? good morning. nice to speak to you. —— in february. there has been a bit of hallucinating, imagining a fierce row. toby has a p pa re ntly imagining a fierce row. toby has apparently been getting dressed for apparently been getting dressed for a taxi and sentencing sea is running through a forest. what is going on? a lot of strange things have been going on —— toby thinks he is
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running. there is no avoiding it, really. so, yes, we have had some freaky breakups. it is pretty terrifying having someone banging on the door in trying to get you to wa ke the door in trying to get you to wake up every two hours. we have reacted in some strange ways. -- wa ke reacted in some strange ways. -- wake ups. it has been good to speak to both of you. stay safe and hopefully we willjoin you when you get to antigua at the start of february. they are rolling the atla ntic to february. they are rolling the atlantic to raise money for harry's brother, who committed suicide ten yea rs brother, who committed suicide ten years ago, and build some programmes and make sure that he serves as an inspiration for them as they try to raise awareness for male suicide. all the best to them. you are watching bbc breakfast. let's bring you the main news. rail fares across england, wales and scotland will rise today, with passengers facing an average increase of more than 2%. public transport campaigners say the fare rises are "another kick in the teeth for long—suffering
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rail passengers". but the transport secretary, chris grayling, said the government was delivering the biggest rail modernisation programme for more than a century. the first funerals have been taking place after a gun attack on a nightclub in turkey. 39 people were killed, many of them foreigners, as they celebrated new year in istanbul. many more were injured. a manhunt is under way to find the gunman. more than 400 people have now died in attacks in turkey in the past few months. five men have been arrested after an apparent hit—and—run in oldham in greater manchester on new year's eve. 12—year—old helina kotlarova was killed. her 11—year—old cousin zaneta krokova is in a critical condition in hospital. police are appealing for witnesses.

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